Monday, June 30, 2014

FreeDOS at 20 years and counting

I'd like to share a celebration with you. As of today, The FreeDOS Project is now 20 years old. Happy birthday, FreeDOS!

FreeDOS dates back to 1994, when I was still a physics undergraduate student. I used MS-DOS to analyze data and write papers for classes. I found DOS to be exactly what I needed to do all of my work. I mostly used a shareware spreadsheet program called "AsEasyAs" (a clone of Lotus 1-2-3) to do my data analysis, and a popular commercial word processor "WordPerfect" to write my papers.

So it was with great disappointment in Spring 1994 that I learned Microsoft would soon stop supporting MS-DOS, in favor of a new version of Windows. While the newer Windows became the hugely successful Windows95, you may remember that Windows 3.11 (current at that time) was not so great. In fact, Windows 3.11 was pretty bad. I didn't like using it; I preferred to do all my word in MS-DOS.

I decided to do something about it. And on June 29, 1994, I announced my intention to write a free version of DOS. I called that first version "PD-DOS" but we renamed our project "FreeDOS" not long after that.

Since then, we have advanced what DOS could do, adding new functionality and making DOS easier to use. For example, FreeDOS lets you access FAT32 file systems and use large disk support (LBA), a feature not available in MS-DOS at the time, and only included in Windows95 and newer. And today in 2014, people continue to use FreeDOS to support embedded systems, to run business software, and to play classic DOS games!

As always, thanks to everyone who has worked on FreeDOS. We wouldn't be here without you!